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Flowering Plants to Welcome your Garden into Spring

Posted by on May 08 2019

As the frost begins to clear and the sun starts to glare, we emerge from hibernation to enjoy the Spring, Summer season. A huge part of this involves appreciating our outdoor spaces and putting our dormant back gardens into use once more with barbecues, soirees or as a haven for children seeking a safe space to play. 
 
To achieve your colourful, vibrant garden of dreams, you must start planting the seed - quite literally - a few months in advance to allow your flowers the chance to blossom to their full beauty. If you are new to gardening, you might be unaware of which flowers bloom the best at this time of year, and how far in advance you will need to plant them to reap the rewards of a flamboyant rainbow garden in time for summer. 
 
Here are five of our favourite annual and perennial flowers that you should begin planting in spring:
 

Gladiolas

 
Gladioli are a true classic, instantly recognised for their tall flowering spikes that have earned the nickname “Sword Lily.” Gladiolas have a small spread, meaning they take up little space in your garden, but still produce up to 40 flowers on one stem. 
 
The colourful flowering plants are a rich accompaniment to spring and summer boquets, so are frequently grown as a cutting flower, in which instances it is best to plant them in rows for ease of tending and harvesting. For peak growth, gladioli appreciate a spot with full sun and well-drained soil, just make sure to plant them in spring to ensure the likelihood of frost has passed and the soil has had chance to warm. 
 
Planting Time: Spring
Flowering Time: Summer
Hardiness Zone: 6 to 10
Mature Size: 60 - 150cm height
 

Hellebore

The common name for Hellebore is Christmas Rose, but that’s not to confuse its ideal time for planting. Hellebore is a flowering perennial plant that blooms at the earliest signs of spring and will likely beat all the other flowers in your garden to it! 

 
The flowers of hellebore are usually in varying hues and shades of blues, greens and purples, adding a muted wash of colour to any garden. Ideal growing conditions for hellebore garden plants are well-drained soil that is neither too dry or excessively wet, a spot in the shade is perfect and they should be protected from any strong winds. 
 
Planting Time: Early spring
Flowering Time: Late winter to early spring
Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9 
Mature Size: 30cm - 120cm height x 45 - 90cm spread
 

Daffodils

Can you think of a flower that shouts “SPRING IS HERE!” more than a daffodil? Year after year, daffodils spring up in gardens, local communities, parks, woodlands and alongside canals at the first hint of warmer weather. The vivid yellow flowers bring us to hope that winter is over and spring and summer will soon be in full swing. 
 
The Daffodil has a range of shape and size variants, small and large-cupped, double and the most common, a trumpet-shaped corona with six petals.  Leafless stems carry up to 20 yellow or white flowers and they make as much of an impact as a cut flower in a bouquet as they do when growing freely in nature. 
 
After the initial planting, daffodils are relatively low maintenance and one of the most reliable perennial flowering plants - just watch them rejuventate spring after spring. However, they do grow best in well-drained soil that is kept moist throughout the spring, summer seasons, and in a location where they receive full sun or very minimal amounts of shade. Although daffodils can tolerate crowding, it's better to plant the bulbs 4-6 inches apart and up to 5 times their own depth. 
 
Planting Time: End of summer
Flowering Time: Early spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9
Mature Size: 30cm height x 30cm spread
 

Tulips

Similarly to daffodils, tulips are another of the original spring garden plants that give us the heads up that we need that winter is firmly over and the spring and summer seasons are within our grasp. 
 
Tulips are amongst the most popular bulbs due to their ease of cultivation, but also their eye-catching appearance. Tulips flower in a rainbow of colours, from traditional red to pinks, oranges, yellows and even white. 
 
The bulbous perennial plants grow best when in well-drained and fertile soils that receive full sun exposure. They are averse to excessively wet conditions, but they do have the growing power to blossom to full beauty in containers as well as being traditionally bedding plants. 
 
Planting Time: Start of autumn
Flowering Time: Spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 8
Mature Size: 15cm - 75cm height x 15cm spread
 

Hyacinths

Another of the earliest spring bulbs that you will find in the nature around you is the Hyacinth. Hyacinths bloom in pastel shades of pinks, blues, lilac and occasionally cream, injecting a happy flush of colour into gardens, woodlands, and as homes as cut flowers.

The colourful and highly fragrant spring flowers can be planted in borders, plant pots and window boxes, provided they are given the best levels of care. When growing outdoors, hyacinths should be kept in well-drained, moist and fertile soil and in a position that takes advantage of full sun. Hyacinth bulbs should also be planted roughly 3inches apart and 4inches deep in outdoor soil. 
 
Flowering Time: Spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9
Mature Size: 20cm - 30cm height x 7.5cm spread
Mature Size: 20cm - 30cm height x 7.5cm spreadAs the frost begins to clear and the sun starts to glare, we emerge from hibernation to enjoy the Spring, Summer season. A huge part of this involves appreciating our outdoor spaces and putting our dormant back gardens into use once more with barbecues, soirees or as a haven for children seeking a safe space to play. 
To achieve your colourful, vibrant garden of dreams, you must start planting the seed - quite literally - a few months in advance to allow your flowers the chance to blossom to their full beauty. If you are new to gardening, you might be unaware of which flowers bloom the best at this time of year, and how far in advance you will need to plant them to reap the rewards of a flamboyant rainbow garden in time for summer. 
Here are five of our favourite annual and perennial flowers that you should begin planting in spring:
Gladiolas
Gladioli are a true classic, instantly recognised for their tall flowering spikes that have earned the nickname “Sword Lily.” Gladiolas have a small spread, meaning they take up little space in your garden, but still produce up to 40 flowers on one stem. 
The colourful flowering plants are a rich accompaniment to spring and summer boquets, so are frequently grown as a cutting flower, in which instances it is best to plant them in rows for ease of tending and harvesting. For peak growth, gladioli appreciate a spot with full sun and well-drained soil, just make sure to plant them in spring to ensure the likelihood of frost has passed and the soil has had chance to warm. 
Planting Time: Spring
Flowering Time: Summer
Hardiness Zone: 6 to 10
Mature Size: 60 - 150cm height
Hellebore
The common name for Hellebore is Christmas Rose, but that’s not to confuse its ideal time for planting. Hellebore is a flowering perennial plant that blooms at the earliest signs of spring and will likely beat all the other flowers in your garden to it! 
The flowers of hellebore are usually in varying hues and shades of blues, greens and purples, adding a muted wash of colour to any garden. Ideal growing conditions for hellebore garden plants are well-drained soil that is neither too dry or excessively wet, a spot in the shade is perfect and they should be protected from any strong winds. 
Planting Time: Early spring
Flowering Time: Late winter to early spring
Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9 
Mature Size: 30cm - 120cm height x 45 - 90cm spread
Daffodils
Can you think of a flower that shouts “SPRING IS HERE!” more than a daffodil? Year after year, daffodils spring up in gardens, local communities, parks, woodlands and alongside canals at the first hint of warmer weather. The vivid yellow flowers bring us to hope that winter is over and spring and summer will soon be in full swing. 
The Daffodil has a range of shape and size variants, small and large-cupped, double and the most common, a trumpet-shaped corona with six petals.  Leafless stems carry up to 20 yellow or white flowers and they make as much of an impact as a cut flower in a bouquet as they do when growing freely in nature. 
After the initial planting, daffodils are relatively low maintenance and one of the most reliable perennial flowering plants - just watch them rejuventate spring after spring. However, they do grow best in well-drained soil that is kept moist throughout the spring, summer seasons, and in a location where they receive full sun or very minimal amounts of shade. Although daffodils can tolerate crowding, it's better to plant the bulbs 4-6 inches apart and up to 5 times their own depth. 
Planting Time: End of summer
Flowering Time: Early spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9
Mature Size: 30cm height x 30cm spread
Tulips
Similarly to daffodils, tulips are another of the original spring garden plants that give us the heads up that we need that winter is firmly over and the spring and summer seasons are within our grasp. 
Tulips are amongst the most popular bulbs due to their ease of cultivation, but also their eye-catching appearance. Tulips flower in a rainbow of colours, from traditional red to pinks, oranges, yellows and even white. 
The bulbous perennial plants grow best when in well-drained and fertile soils that receive full sun exposure. They are averse to excessively wet conditions, but they do have the growing power to blossom to full beauty in containers as well as being traditionally bedding plants. 
Planting Time: Start of autumn
Flowering Time: Spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 8
Mature Size: 15cm - 75cm height x 15cm spread
Hyacinths
Another of the earliest spring bulbs that you will find in the nature around you is the Hyacinth. Hyacinths bloom in pastel shades of pinks, blues, lilac and occasionally cream, injecting a happy flush of colour into gardens, woodlands, and as homes as cut flowers.
The colourful and highly fragrant spring flowers can be planted in borders, plant pots and window boxes, provided they are given the best levels of care. When growing outdoors, hyacinths should be kept in well-drained, moist and fertile soil and in a position that takes advantage of full sun. Hyacinth bulbs should also be planted roughly 3inches apart and 4inches deep in outdoor soil. 
Flowering Time: Spring
Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9
Mature Size: 20cm - 30cm height x 7.5cm spread
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